Branch Bocock

Branch Bocock

Branch Bocock
Bocock pictured in Yackety Yack 1912, North Carolina yearbook
Sport(s) Football, basketball, baseball
Biographical details
Born (1884-03-10)March 10, 1884
Shenandoah, Virginia
Died May 25, 1946(1946-05-25) (aged 62)
Blackstone, Virginia
Alma mater Georgetown University
Playing career
Football
1903–1906 Georgetown
Position(s) Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1908 Georgia
1909–1910 Virginia Tech
1911 North Carolina
1912–1915 Virginia Tech
1920–1921 LSU
1925–1926 South Carolina
1928–1930 William & Mary
1936–1938 William & Mary
Basketball
1909–1911 Virginia Tech
1913–1915 Virginia Tech
1920–1921 LSU
1924–1927 South Carolina
Baseball
1910–1911 Virginia Tech
1914 Virginia Tech
1922–1923 LSU
1925–1927 South Carolina
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1909 Virginia Tech
1925–1926 South Carolina
Head coaching record
Overall 98–55–9 (football)
109–33 (basketball)
70–54–2 (baseball)
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse

James Branch Bocock (March 10, 1884 – May 25, 1946) was an Virginia Tech (1909–1910, 1912–1915), the University of North Carolina (1911), Louisiana State University (1920–1921), the University of South Carolina (1925–1926), and The College of William & Mary (1928–1930, 1936–1938), compiling a career college football record of 98–55–9. Bocock was also the head basketball coach at Virginia Tech (1909–1911, 1913–1915), LSU (1920–1921), and South Carolina (1924–1927), tallying a career college basketball mark of 109–33, and the head baseball coach at Virginia Tech (1910–1911, 1914), LSU (1922–1923), and South Carolina (1925–1927), amassing a career college baseball record of 70–54–2.

Contents

  • Early years 1
  • Coaching career 2
  • Later life 3
  • Head coaching record 4
    • Football 4.1
  • See also 5
  • References 6
    • Additional sources 6.1
  • External links 7

Early years

Bocock was a

External links

  • Reed, Thomas Walter (1949). Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press. History of the University of Georgia; Chapter XVII: Athletics at the University from the Beginning Through 1947 imprint pages 3493

Additional sources

  1. ^ https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11844-55135-96?cc=1861144&wc=MMRW-Y9Z:38187655
  2. ^ "Georgetown's Captain". The Pittsburgh Press. February 13, 1906. 
  3. ^ "The first 117 seasons of football at Virginia Tech". hopkiesports.com. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 
  4. ^  

References

See also

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1908)
1908 Georgia 5–2–1
Georgia: 5–2–1
Virginia Tech Hokies (Independent) (1909–1910)
1909 Virginia Tech 6–1
1910 Virginia Tech 6–2
North Carolina Tar Heels (South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1911)
1911 North Carolina 6–1–1
North Carolina: 6–1–1
Virginia Tech Hokies (South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1912–1915)
1912 Virginia Tech 5–4
1913 Virginia Tech 7–1–1
1914 Virginia Tech 6–2–1
1915 Virginia Tech 4–4
Virginia Tech: 34–14–2
LSU Tigers (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1920–1921)
1920 LSU 5–3–1 0–3
1921 LSU 6–1–1 2–1–1
LSU: 11–4–2 2–4–1
South Carolina Gamecocks (Southern Conference) (1925–1926)
1925 South Carolina 7–3 2–2 T–10th
1926 South Carolina 6–4 4–2 T–4th
South Carolina: 13–7 6–4
William & Mary Indians (Independent) (1928–1930)
1928 William & Mary 6–3–2
1929 William & Mary 8–2
1930 William & Mary 7–2–1
William & Mary Indians (Southern Conference) (1936–1938)
1936 William & Mary 1–8 0–5 16th
1937 William & Mary 4–5 1–3 T–13th
1938 William & Mary 3–7 0–4 15th
William & Mary: 29–27–3 1–12
Total: 98–55–9

Football

Head coaching record

Bocock died at the age of 62 on May 25, 1946 at his home in Blackstone, Virginia.[4]

Later life

At Virginia Tech, Bocock was the team's first true professional coach and the first head football coach to receive a full-time salary.[3]

Although official records give Bocock credit only for coaching the Georgia Tech teams during the game played that year. As a result, Georgia removed all known ringers from its team and Whitney was forced to resign, handing the coaching duties over to Bocock for the last three games. Georgia was 2–1 in those three games.

Coaching career

[2]