G Scorpii

G Scorpii

G Scorpii
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Scorpius
Right ascension 17h 49m 51.48081s[1]
Declination −37° 02′ 35.8975″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 3.21[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type K2 III[3]
U−B color index +1.19[2]
B−V color index +1.17[2]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) +24.7[4] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 40.59[1] mas/yr
Dec.: 27.24[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 25.92 ± 0.15[1] mas
Distance 125.8 ± 0.7 ly
(38.6 ± 0.2 pc)
Details
Mass 1.44 ± 0.21[5] M
Radius 16[6] R
Luminosity 95 ± 6[5] L
Temperature 4,538[5] K
Other designations
G Sco, CD–37 11907, FK5 669, HD 161892, HIP 87261, HR 6630, SAO 209318.

G Scorpii (G Sco) is a star in the constellation Scorpius. It is an orange K-type giant with an apparent magnitude of +3.19. It is approximately 126 light years from Earth.[1] The measured angular diameter of the primary star is 3.94 ± 0.21 mas.[7] At the estimated distance of this system, this yields a physical size of about 16 times the radius of the Sun.[6]

Just 8.5 arcminutes to the east is the globular cluster NGC 6441.

It was formerly known as "Gamma Telescopii" (γ Tel) and "Fuyue" (傅說) in ancient China.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F. (November 2007), "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction", Astronomy and Astrophysics 474 (2): 653–664,  
  2. ^ a b c Johnson, H. L.; et al. (1966), "UBVRIJKL photometry of the bright stars", Communications of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory 4 (99),  
  3. ^ Gray, R. O.; et al. (July 2006), "Contributions to the Nearby Stars (NStars) Project: Spectroscopy of Stars Earlier than M0 within 40 pc-The Southern Sample", The Astronomical Journal 132 (1): 161–170,  
  4. ^ Wilson, Ralph Elmer (1953). General Catalogue of Stellar Radial Velocities. Washington: Carnegie Institution of Washington.  
  5. ^ a b c Stello, D.; et al. (2008), "Oscillating K Giants with the WIRE Satellite: Determination of Their Asteroseismic Masses", The  
  6. ^ a b Lang, Kenneth R. (2006), Astrophysical formulae, Astronomy and astrophysics library 1 (3rd ed.), Birkhäuser,  . The radius (R*) is given by:
    \begin{align} 2\cdot R_* & = \frac{(38.6\cdot 3.94\cdot 10^{-3})\ \text{AU}}{0.0046491\ \text{AU}/R_{\bigodot}} \\ & \approx 32.7\cdot R_{\bigodot} \end{align}
  7. ^ Richichi, A.; Percheron, I.; Khristoforova, M. (February 2005), "CHARM2: An updated Catalog of High Angular Resolution Measurements", Astronomy and Astrophysics 431: 773–777,