IGLL1

IGLL1

Immunoglobulin lambda-like polypeptide 1

PDB rendering based on 2h32.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe, RCSB
Identifiers
Symbols  ; 14.1; AGM2; CD179b; IGL1; IGL5; IGLJ14.1; IGLL; IGO; IGVPB; VPREB2
External IDs GeneCards:
RNA expression pattern
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)
RefSeq (protein)
Location (UCSC)
PubMed search

Immunoglobulin lambda-like polypeptide 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the IGLL1 gene.[1][2][3] IGLL1 has also recently been designated CD179B (cluster of differentiation 179B).

It is associated with agammaglobulinemia-2. The preB cell receptor is found on the surface of proB and preB cells, where it is involved in transduction of signals for cellular proliferation, differentiation from the proB cell to the preB cell stage, allelic exclusion at the Ig heavy chain gene locus, and promotion of Ig light chain gene rearrangements. The preB cell receptor is composed of a membrane-bound Ig mu heavy chain in association with a heterodimeric surrogate light chain. This gene encodes one of the surrogate light chain subunits and is a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. This gene does not undergo rearrangement. Mutations in this gene can result in B cell deficiency and agammaglobulinemia, an autosomal recessive disease in which few or no gamma globulins or antibodies are made. Two transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene.[3]

References

  1. ^ Bauer SR, Huebner K, Budarf M, Finan J, Erikson J, Emanuel BS, Nowell PC, Croce CM, Melchers F (Nov 1988). "The human Vpre B gene is located on chromosome 22 near a cluster of V lambda gene segments". Immunogenetics 28 (5): 328–33.  
  2. ^ Schiff C, Milili M, Fougereau M (Dec 1989). "Isolation of early immunoglobulin lambda-like gene transcripts in human fetal liver". Eur J Immunol 19 (10): 1873–8.  
  3. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: IGLL1 immunoglobulin lambda-like polypeptide 1". 

Further reading

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.