Methylbenzylpiperazine

Methylbenzylpiperazine

Methylbenzylpiperazine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-benzyl-4-methylpiperazine
Clinical data
Legal status
  • II-P(Poland)[1]
Routes oral
Pharmacokinetic data
Metabolism hepatic
Excretion renal
Identifiers
CAS number  YesY
ATC code ?
PubChem
ChemSpider
Synonyms 1-methyl-4-(phenylmethyl)piperazine; 1-methyl-4-benzylpiperazine
Chemical data
Formula C12H18N2 
Mol. mass 190.294 g/mol
 YesY   

MBZP (1-methyl-4-benzylpiperazine) is a stimulant drug which is a derivative of benzylpiperazine. MBZP has been sold as an ingredient in legal recreational drugs known as "Party pills", initially in New Zealand and subsequently in other countries around the world.

The effects of MBZP are very similar to those of BZP, but the stimulant effect is slightly weaker and it seems to have less of a tendency to cause negative side effects such as headaches and nausea.

Based on the recommendation of the EACD, the New Zealand government has passed legislation which placed BZP, along with the other piperazine derivatives TFMPP, mCPP, pFPP, MeOPP and MBZP, into Class C of the New Zealand Misuse of Drugs Act 1975. A ban was intended to come into effect in New Zealand on December 18, 2007, but the law change did not go through until the following year, and the sale of BZP and the other listed piperazines became illegal in New Zealand as of 1 April 2008. An amnesty for possession and usage of these drugs remained until October 2008, at which point they became completely illegal.[2]

MBZP is classified as a class C drug in the UK.

See also

References

  1. ^ = WDU20111050614 "Ustawa z dnia 15 kwietnia 2011 r. o zmianie ustawy o przeciwdziałaniu narkomanii ( Dz.U. 2011 nr 105 poz. 614 )". Internetowy System Aktów Prawnych. Retrieved 17 June 2011. 
  2. ^ Misuse of Drugs (Classification of BZP) Amendment Bill 2008