Panthenol

Panthenol

Panthenol
Stereo, skeletal formula of panthenol (R)
Names
IUPAC name
2,4-Dihydroxy-N-(3-hydroxypropyl)-3,3-dimethylbutanamide[1]
Other names
  • Bepanthen
  • Dexpanthenol
Identifiers
 N
R N
3DMet
ATC code A11
D03, S01
1724945, 1724947 R
ChEBI  N
ChEMBL  N
ChemSpider  Y
R N
S N
EC number 240-540-6
Jmol-3D images Image
Image
KEGG  Y
MeSH
PubChem
 R
 S
RTECS number ES4316500
UNII  Y
Properties
C9H19NO4
Molar mass 205.25 g·mol−1
Appearance Colourless liquid
Density 1.2 g mL−1 (at 20 °C)
Melting point 66 to 69 °C (151 to 156 °F; 339 to 342 K)
log P −0.989
Acidity (pKa) 13.033
Basicity (pKb) 0.964
1.499
Hazards
NFPA 704
1
1
0
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
LD50 (Median dose)
10,100 mg kg−1 (intraperitoneal, mouse); 15,000 mg kg−1 (oral, mouse)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 N  (: Y/N?)

Panthenol (pantothenol) is the alcohol and propylene glycol, soluble in ether and chloroform, and slightly soluble in glycerin.

Panthenol comes in two enantiomers, D and L. Only D-panthenol (dexpanthenol) is biologically active, however both forms have moisturizing properties. For cosmetic use, panthenol comes either in D form, or as a racemic mixture of D and L (DL-panthenol).

Panthenol's expanded chemical formula is: HO-CH2-C(CH3)2-CH(OH)-CONH-CH2CH2CH2-OH.

Contents

  • Uses 1
  • Synonyms 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Uses

Bepanthen eye and nose lotion (Germany)

In cosmetics and personal-care products, panthenol is a humectant, emollient, and moisturizer. It binds to the hair shaft readily; so, it is a common component of commercial shampoos and hair conditioners (in concentrations of 0.1-1.0%). It coats the hair and seals its surface, lubricating the hair shaft and giving it a shiny appearance. It is also recommended by many tattoo artists as a post-tattooing moisturising cream.

Panthenol draws moisture from the atmosphere and readily binds to water molecules. When applied to the hair panthenol will help to moisturize it and give it a shine and gloss. For this reason it has become a very popular ingredient in shampoos and conditioners.

In ointments, panthenol is an effective skin penetrator.[2] It is sometimes mixed with allantoin, in concentrations of up to 2-5%, and is used for treatment of sunburns, mild burns and minor skin disorders. It improves hydration, reduces itching and inflammation of the skin, and accelerates epidermal wounds' rate of healing.[2]

If ingested, panthenol is metabolized to pantothenic acid.

Synonyms

Dexpanthenol

Other names for panthenol include:

  • Butanamide, 2,4-dihydroxy-N-(3-hydroxypropyl)-3,3-dimethyl-, (R)-
  • Butyramide, 2,4-dihydroxy-N-(3-hydroxypropyl)-3,3-dimethyl-, D-(+)-
  • Butanamide, 2,4-dihydroxy-N-(3-hydroxypropyl)-3,3-dimethyl-, (2R)-
  • D-Panthenol
  • Dexpanthenol (DCIR)
  • Dexpanthenolum
  • Propanolamine, N-pantoyl-
  • d-Pantothenyl alcohol
  • Bepanthen

References

  1. ^ "dexpanthenol - Compound Summary". PubChem Compound. USA: National Center for Biotechnology Information. 25 March 2005. Identification. Retrieved 29 June 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Ebner F, Heller A, Rippke F, Tausch I (2002). "Topical Use of Dexpanthenol in Skin Disorders". American Journal of Clinical Dermatology 3 (6): 427–433.  

External links

  • PDR Online : Pantothenic Acid
  • Sci-toys: ingredients: panthenol
  • DSM Nutritional Products Panthenol
  • Record in the Household Products Database of NLM