Parker v. Ellis

Parker v. Ellis
Supreme Court of the United States
Argued January 20, 1960
Decided May 16, 1960
Full case name Parker v. Ellis
Citations 362 more)
Holding
The case was now moot; therefore the court had no jurisdiction to evaluate the merits of petitioner's claim. The writ of certiorari was dismissed for lack of jurisdiction.
Court membership
Case opinions
Per curiam.
Dissent Warren, joined by Douglas, Black, and Brennan
Overruled by
Carafas v. LaVallee, 391 U.S. 234 (1968)

Parker v. Ellis, 362 U.S. 574 (1960), was a United States Supreme Court decision (per curiam) in which the court granted certiorari to review dismissal of petitioner's application for a habeas corpus review. The petitioner claimed that his conviction in a state court had violated the Fourteenth Amendment's Due Process clause. However, the petitioner was released from incarceration before his case could be heard.[1]

Decision

The court held that the case was now moot; therefore the court had no jurisdiction to evaluate the merits of petitioner's claim. The writ of certiorari was dismissed for lack of jurisdiction.[1]

See also

References

Further reading