Analog (chemistry)

Analog (chemistry)

For other uses of analog, see Analog (disambiguation).

In chemistry, a structural analog (structural analogue), also known as chemical analog or simply analog, is a compound having a structure similar to that of another one, but differing from it in respect of a certain component.[1][2][3]

It can differ in one or more atoms, functional groups, or substructures, which are replaced with other atoms, groups, or substructures. A structural analog can be imagined to be formed, at least theoretically, from the other compound.

Despite a high chemical similarity, structural analogs are not necessarily functional analogs and can have very different physical, chemical, biochemical, or pharmacological properties.[4]

In drug development either a large series of structural analogs of an initial lead compound are created and tested as part of a structure-activity relationship study[5] or a database is screened for structural analogs of a lead compound.[6]

Examples

Carbon-Based Silicon-Based

See also

References

External links

  • ChEMBL.