AsiaSat 6
Launch of AsiaSat 6 on the Falcon 9
Mission type Communications
Operator AsiaSat
COSPAR ID 2014-052A
SATCAT № 40141
Mission duration 15 years
Spacecraft properties
Bus LS-1300LL
Manufacturer Space Systems/Loral
Launch mass 4428 kg[1]
Start of mission
Launch date 7 September 2014, 05:00 (2014-09-07T05Z) UTC
Rocket Falcon 9 v1.1
Launch site Cape Canaveral SLC-40
Contractor SpaceX
Orbital parameters
Reference system Geocentric
Regime Geostationary
Longitude 120° East
Semi-major axis 42,164.05 kilometres (26,199.53 mi)[2]
Eccentricity 4.82E-05[2]
Perigee 35,791 kilometres (22,239 mi)[2]
Apogee 35,795 kilometres (22,242 mi)[2]
Inclination 0.02 degrees[2]
Period 1436.11 minutes[2]
Epoch 24 January 2015, 22:30:44 UTC[2]
Transponders
Band 28 C band
Bandwidth 36 MHz
Coverage area Asia
Australia
New Zealand
TWTA power 100 watts

AsiaSat 6 is a Hong Kong geostationary communications satellite which is operated by the Asia Satellite Telecommunications Company was launched into orbit on 7 September 2014.

As of July 2014, 14 of the satellite's 28 transponders are being leased to Thaicom, who will market them as Thaicom 7.[3]

AsiaSat 6 was built by Space Systems/Loral, and is based on the LS-1300LL satellite bus.[4][5] The satellite carries 28 C band transponders and will be positioned at a longitude of 120 degrees East,[6] providing coverage of southern Asia, Australia and New Zealand.[7]

Launch vehicle

SpaceX was contracted to launch AsiaSat 6 using a Falcon 9 v1.1 launch vehicle. The launch took place from Space Launch Complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on 7 September 2014.[3]

The Falcon 9 upper stage used to launch AsiaSat 6 was derelict in a decaying elliptical low-Earth orbit from September to December 2014. Initially, on 9 September 2014, it orbited with a perigee of 165 km (103 mi) and an apogee of 35,723 km (22,197 mi).[8] One month on, the orbit had decayed to an altitude of 153 km (95 mi) at its closest approach to Earth, [9] and by November had decayed to a 125 km (78 mi) perigee.[10] The orbit decayed and the derelict rocket body had reentered the atmosphere prior to 14 December 2014.[11]

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.spacenews.com/article/launch-report/41780spacex-launches-asiasat-6-a-month-after-lofting-asiasat-8
  2. ^ a b c d e f g
  3. ^ a b
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External links