Bazaar

Bazaar

A Moorish Bazaar
"Bazaar at Athens", in the Ottoman Empire Edward Dodwell.
Women purchasing copper utensils in a bazaar in 19th century India.
Mozaffarieh: An alley in Tabriz Bazaar devoted to carpet selling.
Troopers in the Bazaar in 19th century India.
City of Kandahar, its principal bazaar and citadel, taken from the Nakkara Khauna
Vakil Bazaar as seen by Jane Dieulafoy in 1881

A bazaar is a permanent enclosed merchandising area, marketplace, or street of shops where goods and services are exchanged or sold. The term originates from the Persian word bāzār,[1] from Middle Persian wāzār,[2] from Old Persian vāčar,[3] from Proto-Indo-Iranian *wahā-čarana.[4] Souq is another word used in the Middle East for an open-air marketplace or commercial quarter. The term bazaar is sometimes also used to refer to the "network of merchants, bankers, and craftsmen" who work in that area. Although the current meaning of the word is believed to have originated in native Zoroastrian Persia, its use has spread and now has been accepted into the vernacular in countries around the world. The rise of large bazaars and stock trading centers in the Muslim World allowed the creation of new capitals and eventually new empires. New and wealthy cities such as Isfahan, Golconda, Samarkand, Cairo, Baghdad, and Timbuktu were founded along trade routes and bazaars. Street markets is the European and North American equivalents.

Contents

  • Term 1
  • Examples 2
    • Australia 2.1
    • Afghanistan 2.2
    • Azerbaijan 2.3
    • Bangladesh 2.4
    • Bosnia and Herzegovina 2.5
    • China 2.6
    • Egypt 2.7
    • Hong Kong 2.8
    • Israel 2.9
    • India 2.10
    • Iran (Persia) 2.11
    • Kazakhstan 2.12
    • Kuwait 2.13
    • Kyrgyzstan 2.14
    • Lebanon 2.15
    • Macedonia 2.16
    • Malaysia 2.17
    • Nepal 2.18
    • Pakistan 2.19
    • Serbia 2.20
    • Sri Lanka 2.21
    • Syria 2.22
    • Turkmenistan 2.23
    • Turkey 2.24
    • Uzbekistan 2.25
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5
  • External links 6

Term

The origin of the word Bazaar comes from

  • Iran Chamber Society on Architecture of the Bazaar at Isfahan
  • 1911 Britannica article "Bazaar"

External links

  • The Persian Bazaar: Veiled Space of Desire (Mage Publications) by Mehdi Khansari
  • The Morphology of the Persian Bazaar (Agah Publications) by Azita Rajabi.

Further reading

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^ Christou, Jean, "Linguist makes the island a little smaller for all", Cyprus Mail, May 27, 2006
  6. ^

References

See also

Uzbekistan

Turkey

Turkmenistan

  • Al-Buzuriyah Souq in Damascus
  • Al-Hamidiyah Souq in Damascus
  • Souq Atwail in Damascus
  • Souq Al Buzria in Damascus
  • Mathaf Al Sulimani in Damascus
  • Midhat Pasha Souq in Damascus
  • Souq Al-Attareen (Perfumers' Souq) in Aleppo
  • Souq Khan Al-Nahhaseen (Coopery Souq) in Aleppo
  • Souq Al-Haddadeen (Blacksmiths' Souq) in Aleppo
  • Suq Al-Saboun (Soap Souq) in Aleppo
  • Suq Al-Atiq (the Old Souq) in Aleppo
  • Al-Suweiqa (Suweiqa means "small souq" in Arabic) in Aleppo
  • Suq Al-Hokedun (Hokedun means "spiritual house" in Armenian) in Aleppo

Syria

Sri Lanka

Serbia

Pakistan

Nepal

Malaysia

Macedonia

Lebanon

Kyrgyzstan

  • Souq Almubarikiyya

Kuwait

Kazakhstan

Iran (Persia)

India

Israel

Hong Kong

Two Egyptian women shopping at a market next to the Al-Ghouri Complex in Cairo, Egypt.

Egypt

China

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bangladesh

Azerbaijan

Afghanistan

Australia

Examples

In North America, the United Kingdom and some other European countries, the term can be used as a synonym for a "Christmas bazaar, for example.

. bozor: Uzbek and базар: Ukrainian, базар: Russian, bazar: Polish, ბაზარი