DESOXY

DESOXY

DESOXY
Names
IUPAC name
2-(3,5-Dimethoxy-4-methyl-phenyl)-ethylamine
Other names
3,5-Dimethoxy-4-methylphenethylamine
2-(3,5-Dimethoxy-4-methylphenyl)ethanamine
Identifiers
 Y
ChEMBL  Y
ChemSpider  Y
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
C11H17NO2
Molar mass 195.26 g/mol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 Y  (: Y/N?)

4-Desoxymescaline, or 4-methyl-3,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine, is a mescaline analogue related to other psychedelic phenethylamines. It is commonly referred to as DESOXY. DESOXY was discovered by Alexander Shulgin and published in his book PiHKAL.

Contents

  • Effects 1
  • Dosage 2
  • Legality 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Effects

The effects of DESOXY vary significantly from mescaline, despite their chemical similarity.

Dosage

A typical dosage is within the range of 40–120 mg and lasts 6–8 hours.[1]

Legality

In 1970 the Controlled Substances Act placed mescaline into Schedule I in the United States. It is similarly controlled in other nations. Depending on whether or not it is intended for human consumption, 4-desoxymescaline could be considered an analogue of mescaline, under the Federal Analogue Act and similar bills in other countries, making it illegal to manufacture, buy, possess, or distribute without a DEA or related license.

DESOXY is also an isomer of 2C-D which would cause it to fall within the definitions outlined by the Federal Analogue Act

References

  1. ^  

External links

  • Alexander Shulgin, Jacob, P. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Classic Hallucinogens and Their Analogs. NIDA Research Monograph 146 (Hallucinogens: An Update), 1994.