NGC 6541

NGC 6541

NGC 6541
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
Class III[1]
Constellation Corona Australis
Right ascension 18h 08m 02.36s[2]
Declination –43° 42′ 53.6″[2]
Distance 22.8 kly (7.0 kpc)[3]
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.3
Apparent dimensions (V) 15′
Physical characteristics
Mass 5.72×105[4] M
Metallicity –1.53[5] dex
Estimated age 12.93 Gyr[5]
Other designations Caldwell 78

NGC 6541 is a globular cluster in the southern constellation of Corona Australis. It is estimated to be around 14 billion years old.[6]

The globular cluster was discovered by Nicolò Cacciatore (1780 - 1841) at the Palermo Astronomical Observatory, Italy, on March 19, 1826. It was independently found by James Dunlop (1793 – 1848) on July 3, 1826.

References

  1. ^ Shapley, Harlow; Sawyer, Helen B. (August 1927), "A Classification of Globular Clusters", Harvard College Observatory Bulletin (849): 11–14,  
  2. ^ a b Goldsbury, Ryan et al. (December 2010), "The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. X. New Determinations of Centers for 65 Clusters", The Astronomical Journal 140 (6): 1830–1837,  
  3. ^ Paust, Nathaniel E. Q. et al. (February 2010), "The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. VIII. Effects of Environment on Globular Cluster Global Mass Functions", The Astronomical Journal 139 (2): 476–491,  
  4. ^ Boyles, J. et al. (November 2011), "Young Radio Pulsars in Galactic Globular Clusters", The Astrophysical Journal 742 (1): 51,  
  5. ^ a b Forbes, Duncan A.; Bridges, Terry (May 2010), "Accreted versus in situ Milky Way globular clusters",  
  6. ^ O'Meara, Stephen James (2011). Deep-Sky Companions: The Secret Deep. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. p. 322.  

External links

  • NGC 6541 at SEDS NGC objects pages
  • NGC 6541 at DOCdb (Deep Sky Observer's Companion)]
  • NGC 6541 on WikiSky: DSS2, SDSS, GALEX, IRAS, Hydrogen α, X-Ray, Astrophoto, Sky Map, Articles and images