News anchor

News anchor

"Anchorman" redirects here. For the film, see Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy.
"Anchorwoman" redirects here. For the TV series, see Anchorwoman (TV series).

A news presenter (also known as newsreader, newscaster, anchorman or anchorwoman, news anchor or simply anchor) is a person who presents news during a news program in the format of a television show, on the radio or the Internet.

News presenters can work in a radio studio, television studio and from remote broadcasts in the field especially weather forecasters.

Newscasters and newsreaders

A newscaster (short for "news broadcaster") is a presenter of news bulletins. This person may be working in the field of broadcast journalism as a journalist and electronic news gathering (ENG) as well as a participant in compiling the script with a television producer to be delivered in a news bulletin.

Prior to the television era, radio-news broadcasts often mixed news with opinion and each presenter strove for a distinctive style. These presenters were referred to as commentators. The last major figure to present commentary in a news broadcast format in the US was Paul Harvey.[1] Today, commentary is generally presented in the longer-form talk show format. The term "newscaster" came into common use to distinguish presenters of straight news broadcasts from commentators.

In Britain, ITN's news presenters (especially those on ITV News) are referred to as newscasters (and have been since the 1950s), whilst those working at the BBC are called newsreaders.

News anchors

In the United States and Canada, news anchors (also known as, "anchormen", or "anchorwomen") present material prepared for a news program and, at times, must improvise commentary for live presentation. Many anchors are also involved in writing and/or editing the news for their programs.

The term "anchor man" was used to describe Walter Cronkite's role at the Democratic and Republican National Conventions.[2] The widespread North American factoid that news anchors were called cronkiters in Swedish[3] has been debunked by linguist Ben Zimmer.[4] Zimmer (and others) also note that the term "anchor" was in common use in 1952 to describe the most prominent member of a panel of reporters or experts. For example, in 1948 "anchor man" was used in the game show "Who Said That?" to refer to John Cameron Swayze, who was a permanent panel member of the show, in what may be the first usage of this term on television.[5] In track and field, the anchor position is the (usually fastest) person running the critical last leg in a relay race. In the original format of Meet The Press, Lawrence E. Spivak, who served as the only permanent member of a panel of four reporters, anchored the panel. Later, the term was applied to hosts of special events coverage and, still later, news presenters.

See also

References