Olanzapine/fluoxetine

Olanzapine/fluoxetine

Template:Drugbox

The drug combination olanzapine/fluoxetine (trade name Symbyax, created by Eli Lilly and Company) is a single capsule containing the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine. Olanzapine/fluoxetine is primarily used to treat the depressive episodes of bipolar I disorder as well as treatment-resistant depression.[1]

Indications

Olanzapine/fluoxetine was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the depressive episodes of bipolar I disorder in 2003.[1] In 2009, it was granted approval for the treatment of treatment-resistant depression.[2]

Olanzapine/fluoxetine, or other antidepressant/antipsychotic combinations, are sometimes prescribed off-label for anxiety disorders,[3] eating disorders,[4] obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD),[5] and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).[6]

Available dosages

Olanzapine/fluoxetine is available as a capsule. Currently, five dosage combinations are produced (measured in mg olanzapine/mg fluoxetine): 3 mg/25 mg, 6 mg/25 mg, 6 mg/50 mg, 12 mg/25 mg, 12 mg/50 mg.[1]

Side effects

Possible side effects of olanzapine/fluoxetine include all those of the two component drugs: olanzapine and fluoxetine. Common side effects include suicidal thoughts, increased appetite, weight gain, drowsiness, fatigue, dry mouth, swelling, tremor, blurred vision and difficulty concentrating.[1]

Olanzapine/fluoxetine could produce a severe allergic reaction and should not be used if the patient has previously experienced an allergic reaction to either fluoxetine or olanzapine.[7]

Olanzapine, is correlated with an increase in blood sugar. Patients with diabetes, or those at risk for developing it, require careful monitoring.[7]

In rare cases, olanzapine/fluoxetine may cause neuroleptic malignant syndrome.[1]

Like other SSRIs, olanzapine/fluoxetine carries a black box warning stating that it could increase the risk of suicide in patients ages 24 and under. The warning also states that olanzapine/fluoxetine may increase the risk of death in elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis.[1]

References

External links

  • Official U.S. website