Penicillin G

Penicillin G

Benzylpenicillin, commonly known as penicillin G, is the gold standard type of penicillin. Penicillin G is typically given parenterally, bypassing the intestines, because it is unstable in the highly acidic stomach. Because the drug is given parenterally, higher tissue concentrations of penicillin G can be achieved than is possible with phenoxymethylpenicillin. These higher concentrations translate to increased antibacterial activity.

Antimicrobial Potency

As an antibiotic, Penicillin G is noted to possess effectiveness mainly against Gram-positive organisms. Some Gram-negative organisms such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis are also reported to be susceptible to Penicillin G.[1]

Medical uses

Specific indications for benzylpenicillin include:[2]

Adverse effects

Adverse effects can include hypersensitivity reactions including urticaria, fever, joint pains, rashes, angioedema, anaphylaxis, serum sickness-like reaction. Rarely CNS toxicity including convulsions (especially with high doses or in severe renal impairment), interstitial nephritis, haemolytic anaemia, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, and coagulation disorders. Also reported diarrhea (including antibiotic-associated colitis).

Toxicology

Benzylpenicillin serum concentrations can be monitored either by traditional microbiological assay or by more modern chromatographic techniques. Such measurements can be useful to avoid central nervous system toxicity in any patient receiving large doses of the drug on a chronic basis, but they are especially relevant to patients with renal failure, who may accumulate the drug due to reduced urinary excretion rates.[3][4]

Compendial status

References

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