Sun (surname)

Sun (surname)

Sun () is a translation of a common Chinese surname (simplified Chinese: 孙; traditional Chinese: 孫; pinyin: Sūn). Other transliterations include Suen (Hong Kong and regions with Cantonese-speaking populations), Sen (Amoy dialect), Sng (Teochew), Tôn (Vietnam), Son (Japan/Korea), Soon (regions with Hokkien-speaking populations), Suan (Philippines), and Swen.

Note that in Hong Kong and regions with Cantonese-speaking populations, the surname Xin (辛) is also transliterated as Sun.

Contents

  • Origins 1
  • Notable people 2
    • Historical figures (in chronological order) 2.1
    • Military and government 2.2
    • Other notable people 2.3
    • Fictional people 2.4
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Origins

Notable people

Historical figures (in chronological order)

  • Sun Tzu (544 – 496 BC) – a militarist in the Spring and Autumn Period, the author of The Art of War.
  • Sun Yang (Bole) – a horse physiognomer of the Spring and Autumn Period.
  • Sun Bin (a.k.a. Sun Tzu, Sunzi, died 316 BC) – a militarist in the Warring States period and descendant of Sun Tzu.
  • Sun Cheng (died 132)
  • Sun Jing (孫敬) – 2nd-century native of Hsin-tu in Chihli, who was such an ardent student that at night he always tied his hair to a beam overhead, to prevent himself from dozing over his books. He also habitually bolted the door of his study to keep out intruders.[1]
  • Sun Jian (155–191), Military General and Warlord in the Late Han Dynasty
  • Sun Ce (175–200), Eldest Son of Sun Jian Warlord in the Late Han Dynasty
  • Sun Quan (182–252),Second Son of Sun Jian Founding Emperor of Eastern Wu
  • Sun Liang (243–260), Second Emperor of Eastern Wu
  • Sun Xiu (235–264), Third Emperor of Eastern Wu
  • Sun Hao (242–284), Fourth and Last Emperor of Eastern Wu
  • Lady Sun Sun Jian Daughter Third Wife of Liu Bei
  • Sun Jing, Brother of Sun Jian general in the Late Han Dynasty
  • Sun Yu,
  • Sun Fu,
  • Sun Ben, General and Nephew under Sun Jian
  • Sun Yi, Third Son of Sun Jian
  • Sun Kuang, Fourth Son of Sun Jian
  • Sun Lang, legitimate son of Sun Jian
  • Sun Deng, Sun Quan Eldest Son
  • Sun He.Sun Quan Third Son and Father of Sun Hao
  • Sun Qian – Official of Warlord Liu Bei in the late Han Dynasty.
  • Sun Kang (孫康; 4th century) – A native of Luoyang, who in his youth was so poor that he could not afford a lamp to read by. He therefore studied in winter by light reflected from the snow, and ultimately rose to be a Censor.[2]
  • Sun Sheng- (4th century) – a Chinese historian.
  • Sun Tzu (a.k.a. Sunzi; fl. 4th century) – mathematician famous for the Chinese remainder theorem.
  • Sun Chuo (320–377) – a poet of the Six Dynasties poetry tradition.
  • Sun En (died 402) – leader of a rebellion against the Jin dynasty.
  • Sun Simiao (581–682)- a traditional Chinese medicine physician of the Sui and Tang dynasties.
  • Sun Yuanheng (died 696)
  • Sun Shi (962–1033) – a native of Po-p'ing in Shandong, who graduated as jinshi after nine attempts and entered the public service, rising to high office under the Emperor Cheu Tseung. In 1008 there was a pretended revelation from God in the form of a letter, which the Emperor and his Court regarded with profound awe. But Sun Shi said, "I have heard that God does not speak; how then should He write a letter?"[3]
  • Sun Ch'ang-ju – a scholar of the Song dynasty, noted for his vast collection of books, which earned for him the sobriquet of Library Sun. In 1015 he was made Magistrate of Hsun-chou in Kuangsi, and subsequently rose to an important office in the household of the Heir Apparent.[3]
  • Sun Fang (12th century) – An Imperial physician, who called himself the Hermit of the Four Stops. He explained this to mean that when he had taken his fill of plain food, he stopped; when he had put on enough plain clothes to keep himself warm, he stopped; when he had realized a fair proportion of his wishes, he stopped; and that after growing old, free from covetousness or envy, he would also be prepared to stop.[4]
  • Sun Qifeng (1583–1675) – a Confucian scholar.
  • Sun Chuanting (1593–1643) – a Chinese Field Marshal.
  • Sun Sike (died 1700) – a Chinese Bannerman, noted for his successes against the Oelots, against the Shensi rebels in 1675–79, and against Galdan. He rose to be a general, and was ennobled as Baron.[5]

Military and government

Other notable people

Fictional people

References

  1. ^ a b Herbert Allen Giles, A Chinese Biographical Dictionary, p. 688 (1898).
  2. ^ Herbert Allen Giles, A Chinese Biographical Dictionary, p. 692 (1898).
  3. ^ a b Herbert Allen Giles, A Chinese Biographical Dictionary, p. 686 (1898).
  4. ^ Herbert Allen Giles, A Chinese Biographical Dictionary, p. 689-690 (1898).
  5. ^ Herbert Allen Giles, A Chinese Biographical Dictionary, p. 695 (1898).
  6. ^ Herbert Allen Giles, A Chinese Biographical Dictionary, p. 691 (1898).
  7. ^ Herbert Allen Giles, A Chinese Biographical Dictionary, p. 693 (1898).

External links

  • Chinese Sun surname history